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MSU environmental activities and accomplishments, from sources on and off-campus. For additional information on MSU environmental work, see these sources.

 


Knight Center-affiliated research assistant awarded conservation and environmental leadership fellowship
MSU School of Journalism
2-12-2018

Doctoral student and Knight Center-affiliated research assistant, Apoorva Joshi, was awarded the annual Theodore Roosevelt Conservation and Environmental Leadership Fellowship by Michigan State University this month. The fellowship, announced by MSU’s Graduate School, aims to provide graduate or professional students the support to pursue opportunities for gaining leadership experience in environment or conservation-based professions or programs. Recipients are required to have exhibited an interest in leadership and in local and global environmental and conservation issues. More»

 

MSU uses $3M NASA grant to find better ways to regulate dams
MSU Today
2-8-2018

Michigan State University researchers, including ESPP Director Dr. Jinhua Zhao, equipped with $3 million from NASA, will investigate innovative methods to improve dams so that they are less harmful to people and the environment. More»

 

$2.5M Grant to Help Improve Agricultural Consumption of Water, Energy
MSU Today
1-18-2018

Michigan State University scientists are leading a $2.5 million USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture grant to better manage these resources and define more sustainable ways for irrigated agriculture to meet current and future demand for food. MSU scientists contributing to this study include: Annick Anctil, Bruno Basso, Anthony Kendall, Paolo Sabbatini, Jinhua Zhao and Adam Zwickle. “Irrigated agriculture is at the core of the nexus of food, energy and water, or FEW, systems,” said David Hyndman, MSU hydrogeologist and the grant’s lead investigator. “Global change is expected to place additional pressure on these systems as U.S. climate warms and becomes more variable, and demand for food increases due to global population growth and diet shifts.” More»

 

MSU's Zipkin takes key role in large-scale seabird study
MSU Research
1-8-2018

Flying 200 feet above the oceanic waters of the Gulf of Mexico, scientific observers peer out a small plane’s windows in search of seabirds. Sometimes they see a flock of birds, or just a few, but nevertheless, they document the species, how many, and where they saw them. Back at Michigan State University (MSU), quantitative ecologist Elise Zipkin will play a lead role in the model development of aerial seabird data for the Gulf of Mexico Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (GoMMAPPS). The study area spans the coast from the Texas-Mexico border down to the tip of Florida. MSU will receive $300,000 for its role in the multi-million dollar, four-year venture funded by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), part of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The project is anticipated to be on More»

 

Streams can be sensors
MSU Today
12-27-2017

Scientists at Michigan State University have shown that streams can be key health indicators of a region’s landscape, but the way they’re being monitored can be improved. New research featured in Ecology Letters showcases how streams can be used as sensors to diagnose a watershed’s sensitivity or resiliency to changes in land use practices, including the long-term use of fertilizers. Using streams as sensors ­– specifically, near the headwaters – can allow scientists, land-use managers and farmers to diagnose which watersheds can be more sustainably developed for food production, said Jay Zarnetske, MSU earth and environmental scientist and co-author of the study. More»

Communication professors receive grant for health research
MSU Today
11-28-2017

Michigan State University communication professors James Dearing and Maria Lapinski have received a grant to research which effective and low-cost healthcare practices from other countries could be successful if implemented in the United States. More»

 

NASA grants MSU $1.5 million to study how humans hurt the environment
Great Lakes Echo
11-17-2017

What’s tall and puffy but invasive all over? Phragmites, large-stature cattail plants which are taking over Michigan wetlands. The tall reeds steal food, water and sunlight from native species. The phragmites grow in dense clusters making them hard to eradicate and manage. “It’s a matter of these species being pushed out of their native habitat and large format plants aren’t actually growing,” said Michigan State hydrogeologist Dr. David Hyndman. Wetlands provide essential services for an ecosystem, like water filtration, sheltering animals, protection from floods and more. Corrupting such an integral part of the environment can have widespread consequences. The problem is only worsening in part because of Michigan farmers with excessive fertilizer usage. Fertilizers are cheap so farmers can use lots of it to increase crop yields – but all the extra chemicals run-off and affect environments miles away. Thus, exacerbating the phragmite problem. More»

 

ESPP Founding Director Thomas Dietz named University Distinguished Professor
MSU Today
10-31-2017

Thomas Dietz: Professor, Department of Sociology, College of Social Science; professor of environmental science and policy; professor of animal studies; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability has been named University Distinguished Professor in recognition of his achievements in the classroom, laboratory and community. More»

 

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